Shelburne and Birchtown Nova Scotia

DSC02954

Shelbourne, on Nova Scotia’s southeast coast, was an 18th- and 19th-century shipbuilding center that was founded in 1783. It grew to 10,000 people within a year, primarily due to British loyalists who fled America after the Revolution. It eventually grew larger than Montreal and Quebec before the British-run Canadian government stopped providing free land and [Read more …]

Lunenburg Nova Scotia and Makone Bay

DSC02871

The coastline of Makone Bay is is pretty as St. Margaret’s Bay (see previous post), its next-door neighbor. While the coast has a number of scenic coves, it also has two of the pretties towns on the province’s central coast.   Mahone Bay The town of Mahone Bay is a pretty coastal town with many [Read more …]

Peggy’s Cove Nova Scotia and Its Lighthouse

DSC02866

The drive from Louisbourg to Nova Scotia’s southern shore is no easy proposition. Although the scenic town of Peggy’s Cove (just south of Halifax) isn’t that far from Louisbourg as the crow flies, navigating it by car requires a very long (500 kilometer, 5 hour) drive. The only way to get from one town to [Read more …]

Louisbourg Nova Scotia and its Fortress

DSC02810

The town of Louisbourg is notable primarily as the 18th-century site of the largest (4,000 to 5,000 people on almost 15,000 acres) French military fortress and thriving fishing town on the Atlantic coast. (A fortress, as we learned is a military base that includes a town within its walls.) The Fortress of Louisbourg served as [Read more …]

The Towns of Cape Breton Island

DSC02663

The focus of our Cape Bretton trip was the Cabot Trail, the National Park and its trails. Towns, however, do make convenient evening and restaurant stops and sometimes have other attractions that can’t be found in nature. We stopped at three of the island’s primary towns. Cheticamp Cheticamp, a town at the Western entry to [Read more …]

Cape Breton Highland Restaurants and Entertainment

DSC02580_thumb

We ate lunch at four restaurants in towns in and surrounded by Cape Breton National Park: Cheticamp Restaurants Cheticamp, the town at the western entrance to the park, does have a handful of full service, generally family-oriented restaurants that offer a selection of comfort foods (especially pizza), standard popular appetizers, meats, pasta, local favorites (such [Read more …]

The Natural Splendor of Cape Bretton Island

image

As mentioned in our previous post, Cape Breton is the island at the northern tip of Nova Scotia. The island, and especially the portion of the Cabot Trail that encircles the highlands near the northern tip of the island (primarily the section of the trail that is in Cape Breton National Park) was our primary [Read more …]

Glenora Distillery: Easing into Cape Breton Island with a Stiff Drink

DSC02560

Cape Breton is the island at the northern tip of Nova Scotia. The island, and especially the portion of the Cabot Trail that encircles the highlands near the northern tip of the island, was our primary motivation for visiting Nova Scotia. We began our journey by driving clockwise (the route recommended for the most dramatic [Read more …]

Experiencing Bay of Fundy Tides

DSC02543

The northwestern edge of Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley, along the Mina Basin, has a unique feature that makes it a particularly interesting destination–the largest tidal variations in the world. Although these variations differ depending on the alignment of the sun and the moon, they average 12 meters and can exceed 16 meters (over 50 feet) [Read more …]

Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley and the Mina's Basin

DSC02539

Our next stop in Nova Scotia was the Annapolis Valley, a 150 km-long valley that runs along the Mina’s Basin, an estuary that is separated from the body of the Bay of Fundy by the mountainous Cape Blomidon. The region is notable for a number of reasons, including; It’s geology and microclimate, which makes it [Read more …]